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README

  Mouse Support in xf86-input-mouse
  Original version written by Kazutaka Yokota for XFree86 on 17 December 2002
  Updated by Alan Coopersmith for X.Org releases
  ____________________________________________________________

  Table of Contents


  1. Introduction
  2. Supported Hardware
  3. OS Support for Mice
     3.1 Summary of Supported Mouse Protocol Types
     3.2 BSD/OS
     3.3 FreeBSD
     3.4 FreeBSD(98)
     3.5 Interactive Unix
     3.6 Linux
     3.7 Linux/98
     3.8 LynxOS
     3.9 NetBSD
     3.10 NetBSD/pc98
     3.11 OpenBSD
     3.12 OS/2
     3.13 SCO
     3.14 Solaris
     3.15 SVR4
     3.16 PANIX

  4. Configuring Your Mouse
  5. xorg.conf Options
     5.1 Buttons
     5.2 ZAxisMapping
     5.3 Resolution
     5.4 Drag Lock Buttons

  6. Mouse Gallery
     6.1 MS IntelliMouse (serial, PS/2)
     6.2 MS IntelliMouse Explorer (PS/2, USB)
     6.3 Kensington Thinking Mouse and Kensington Expert Mouse (serial,
         PS/2)
     6.4 Genius NetScroll (PS/2)
     6.5 Genius NetMouse and NetMouse Pro (serial, PS/2)
     6.6 Genius NetScroll Optical (PS/2, USB)
     6.7 ALPS GlidePoint (serial, PS/2)
     6.8 ASCII MieMouse (serial, PS/2)
     6.9 Logitech MouseMan+ and FirstMouse+ (serial, PS/2)
     6.10 IBM ScrollPoint (PS/2)
     6.11 8D ScrollMouse (serial, PS/2)
     6.12 A4 Tech 4D mice (serial, PS/2, USB)

  7. Configuration Examples


  ______________________________________________________________________

  1.  Introduction


  This document describes mouse support in the xf86-input-mouse driver
  for the Xorg X server.   This driver is mainly used on non-Linux
  operating systems such as BSD & Solaris, as modern Linux systems use
  the xf86-input-evdev driver instead.

  Mouse configuration has often been mysterious task for novice users.
  However, once you learn several basics, it is straightforward to write
  the mouse "InputDevice" section in the xorg.conf file by hand.


  2.  Supported Hardware


  The xf86-input-mouse driver supports four classes of mice: serial,
  bus and PS/2 mice, and additional mouse types supported by specific
  operating systems, such as USB mice.


     Serial mouse
        The serial mouse was once the most popular pointing device for
        PCs.  There have been numerous serial mouse models from a number
        of manufactures.  Despite the wide range of variations, there
        have been relatively few protocols (data format) with which the
        serial mouse talks to the host computer.

        The modern serial mouse conforms to the PnP COM device
        specification so that the host computer can automatically detect
        the mouse and load an appropriate driver.  The X server supports
        this specification and can detect popular PnP serial mouse
        models on most platforms.


     Bus mouse
        The bus mouse connects to a dedicated interface card in an
        expansion slot.  Some video cards, notably those from ATI, and
        integrated I/O cards may also have a bus mouse connector.  Some
        bus mice are known as `InPort mouse'.

        Note that some mouse manufacturers have sold a package including
        a serial mouse and a serial interface card.  Don't confuse this
        type of products with the genuine bus mouse.


     PS/2 mouse
        They are sometimes called `Mouse-port mouse'.  The PS/2 mouse was
        common for a generation after serial mice, and most laptops still
        use the PS/2 protocol for built-in pointer devices.

        The PS/2 mouse is an intelligent device and may have more than
        three buttons and a wheel or a roller.  The PS/2 mouse is
        usually compatible with the original PS/2 mouse from IBM
        immediately after power up.  The PS/2 mouse with additional
        features requires a specialized initialization procedure to
        enable these features.  Without proper initialization, it
        behaves as though it were an ordinary two or three button mouse.


     USB mouse
        USB (Universal Serial Bus) ports are present on most modern
        computers. Several devices can be plugged into this bus,
        including mice and keyboards.

        This driver includes support for USB mice on some systems.

  Many mice nowadays can be used both as a serial mouse and as a PS/2
  mouse, or as both a PS/2 and a USB mouse.  They have logic to distinguish
  which interface it is connected to.  However, a mouse which is not
  marketed as compatible with both mouse interfaces lacks this logic and
  cannot be used in such a way, even if you can find an appropriate adapter
  with which you can connect the mouse to a different format port.

  This driver supports a mouse with a wheel, a roller or a knob.  Its
  action is detected as the Z (third) axis motion of the mouse.  As the
  X server or clients normally do not use the Z axis movement of the
  pointing device, a configuration option, "ZAxisMapping", is provided
  to assign the Z axis movement to another axis or a pair of buttons
  (see below).


  3.  OS Support for Mice



  3.1.  Summary of Supported Mouse Protocol Types


                                  Protocol Types
                  serial     PnP     BusMouse    PS/2   Extended PS/2
  OS platforms   protocols  serial   protocol  protocol  protocols
                            "Auto"  "BusMouse"  "PS/2"   "xxxPS/2"    USB
  -------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BSD/OS            Ok        ?         ?         ?         ?          ?
  FreeBSD           Ok        Ok        Ok        Ok        SP*1       SP*1
  FreeBSD(98)       Ok        ?         Ok        NA        NA         ?
  Interactive Unix  Ok        NA        ?*1       ?*1       NA         ?
  Linux             Ok        Ok        Ok        Ok        Ok         ?
  Linux/98          Ok        ?         Ok        NA        NA         ?
  LynxOS            Ok        NA        Ok        Ok        NA         ?
  NetBSD            Ok        Ok        Ok        SP*1      SP*1       SP*1
  NetBSD/pc98       Ok        ?         Ok        NA        NA         NA
  OpenBSD           Ok        Ok        Ok        Ok*1      Ok*1       Ok*1
  SCO               Ok        ?         SP*1      SP*1      NA         ?
  Solaris 2.x       Ok        NA*1      ?*1       Ok        Ok         SP*1
  SVR4              Ok        NA*1      SP*1      SP*1      NA         ?
  PANIX             Ok        ?         SP*1      SP*1      NA         ?

  Ok: support is available,  NA: not available, ?: untested or unknown.
  SP: support is available in a different form

  *1 Refer to the following sections for details.



  3.2.  BSD/OS

  No testing has been done with BSD/OS.


  3.3.  FreeBSD

  FreeBSD supports the "SysMouse" protocol which must be specified when
  the moused daemon is running in versions 2.2.1 or later.

  When running the mouseddaemon, you must always specify the
  /dev/sysmouse device and the "SysMouse" protocol to the X server,
  regardless of the actual type of your mouse.

  FreeBSD versions 2.2.6 or later include the kernel-level support for
  extended PS/2 mouse protocols and there is no need to specify the
  exact protocol name to the X server.  Instead specify the "PS/2" or
  "Auto" protocol and the X server will automatically make use of the
  kernel-level support.

  In fact, "Auto" protocol support is really efficient in these
  versions.  You may always specify "Auto" to any mouse, serial, bus or
  PS/2, unless the mouse is an old serial model which doesn't support
  PnP.

  FreeBSD versions 2.2.5 or earlier do not support extended PS/2 mouse
  protocols ("xxxPS/2").  Always specify the "PS/2" protocol for any
  PS/2 mouse in these versions regardless of the brand of the mouse.

  FreeBSD versions 3.1 or later have support for USB mice.  Specify the
  "Auto" protocol for the /dev/ums0 device.  (If the moused daemon is
  running for the USB mouse, you must use /dev/sysmouse instead of
  /dev/ums0 as explained above.) See the ums(4) manual page for details.


  3.4.  FreeBSD(98)

  The PS/2 mouse is not supported.


  3.5.  Interactive Unix

  The PnP serial mouse support (the "Auto" protocol) is not supported
  for the moment.

  The bus mouse and PS/2 mouse should be supported by using the
  appropriate device drivers.  Use /dev/mouse for the "BusMouse"
  protocol and /dev/kdmouse for the "PS/2" protocol.  These protocols
  are untested but may work.  Please send success/failure reports to
  <mailto:michael.rohleder@stadt-frankfurt.de>


  3.6.  Linux

  All protocol types should work.


  3.7.  Linux/98

  The PS/2 mouse is not supported.


  3.8.  LynxOS

  The PnP serial mouse support (the "Auto" protocol) is disabled in
  LynxOS, because of limited TTY device driver functionality.


  3.9.  NetBSD

  NetBSD 1.3.x and former does not support extended PS/2 mouse protocols
  ("xxxPS/2").  The PS/2 mouse device driver /dev/pms emulates the bus
  mouse.  Therefore, you should always specify the "BusMouse" protocol
  for any PS/2 mouse regardless of the brand of the mouse.

  The "wsmouse" protocol introduced in NetBSD 1.4 along with the wscons
  console driver is supported. You need to run binaries compiled on
  NetBSD 1.4 to have support for it though. Use "/dev/wsmouse0" for the
  device. Refer to the wsmouse(4) manual page for kernel configuration
  informations.

  This driver also provides support for USB mice. See the ums(4) manual
  page for details.


  3.10.  NetBSD/pc98

  The PS/2 mouse is not supported.



  3.11.  OpenBSD

  The raw PS/2 mouse device driver /dev/psm0 uses the raw PS/2 mouse
  protocol.

  OpenBSD 2.2 and earlier does not support extended PS/2 mouse protocols
  ("xxxPS/2") . Therefore, you should specify the "PS/2" protocol for
  any PS/2 mouse regardless of the brand of the mouse.

  OpenBSD 2.3 and later support all extended PS/2 mouse protocols.  You
  can select the "Auto" protocol for PnP PS/2 mice or any specific
  extended ("xxxPS/2") protocol for non PnP mice.

  There is also a cooked PS/2 mouse device driver /dev/pms0 which
  emulates the bus mouse. Specify the "BusMouse" protocol for any PS/2
  mouse regardless of the brand of the mouse when using this device.

  XFree86 3.3.6 support USB mice on OpenBSD 2.6 and later though the
  generic Human Interface Device (hid) /dev/uhid*. Select the "usb"
  protocol and the /dev/uhid* instance corresponding to your mouse as
  the device name.


  3.12.  OS/2

  X11R7.5/OS2 always uses the native mouse driver of the operating
  system and will support any type of pointer that the OS supports,
  whether it is serial, bus mouse, or PnP type.  If the mouse works
  under Presentation Manager, it will also work under X11R7.5/OS2.

  Always specify "OSMouse" as the protocol type.


  3.13.  SCO

  The bus and PS/2 mouse are supported with the "OSMouse" protocol type.

  The "OSMouse" may also be used with the serial mouse.


  3.14.  Solaris

  Testing has been done with Solaris 2.5.1, 2.6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11.

  On Solaris 10 1/06 and later versions with "virtual mouse" support,
  all PS/2 and USB mice connected to the system can be accessed via the
  /dev/mouse device using the VUID protocol, including USB mice plugged
  in after the X server is started. On older releases or to address mice
  individually, specific devices and protocols may be used.

  Logitech and Microsoft bus mice have not been tested, but might work
  with the /dev/logi and /dev/msm devices.  Standard 2 and 3 button PS/2
  mice work with the "PS/2" protocol type and the /dev/kdmouse device.
  USB mice work with the "VUID" protocol type and the /dev/mouse device.
  The PnP serial mouse support via the "Auto" protocol has been tested
  and does not work. The "Auto" protocol can however detect PS/2 and USB
  mice correctly.

  Additional USB mice can be connected using the "VUID" protocol type
  and the appropriate "/dev/usb/hid" device with the
       Option "StreamsModule" "usbms"
  line included in the associated "InputDevice" section.



  3.15.  SVR4

  The bus and PS/2 mouse may be supported with the "Xqueue" protocol
  type.

  The "Xqueue" may also be used with the serial mouse.

  The PnP serial mouse support (the "Auto" protocol) is not tested.


  3.16.  PANIX

  The PC/AT version of PANIX supports the bus and PS/2 mouse with the
  "Xqueue" protocol type.  The PC-98 version of PANIX supports the bus
  mouse with the "Xqueue" protocol type.


  4.  Configuring Your Mouse


  Before editing the xorg.conf file to set up mouse configuration, you
  must identify the interface type, the device name and the protocol
  type of your mouse.  Blindly trying every possible combination of
  mouse settings will lead you nowhere.

  The first thing you need to know is the interface type of the mouse
  you are going to use.  It can be determined by looking at the
  connector of the mouse.  The serial mouse has a D-Sub female 9- or
  25-pin connector.  The bus mice have either a D-Sub male 9-pin
  connector or a round DIN 9-pin connector.  The PS/2 mouse is equipped
  with a small, round DIN 6-pin connector.  USB mice have a thin
  rectangular connector.  Some mice come with adapters with which the
  connector can be converted to another. If you are to use such an
  adapter, remember that the connector at the very end of the
  mouse/adapter pair is what matters.

  The next thing to decide is a device node to use for the given
  interface.  For the bus and PS/2 mice, there is little choice; your OS
  most possibly offers just one device node each for the bus mouse and
  PS/2 mouse.  There may be more than one serial port to which the
  serial mouse can be attached.

  The next step is to guess the appropriate protocol type for the mouse.
  The X server may be able to select a protocol type for the given mouse
  automatically in some cases.  Otherwise, the user has to choose one
  manually.  Follow the guidelines below.


     Bus mouse
        The bus and InPort mice always use "BusMouse" protocol
        regardless of the brand of the mouse.

        Some OSs may allow you to specify "Auto" as the protocol type
        for the bus mouse.


     PS/2 mouse
        The "PS/2" protocol should always be tried first for the PS/2
        mouse regardless of the brand of the mouse.  Any PS/2 mouse
        should work with this protocol type, although wheels and other
        additional features are unavailable in the X server.

        After verifying the mouse works with this protocol, you may
        choose to specify one of "xxxPS/2" protocols so that extra
        features are made available in the X server.  However, support
        for these PS/2 mice assumes certain behavior of the underlying
        OS and may not always work as expected.  Support for some PS/2
        mouse models may be disabled all together for some OS platforms
        for this reason.

        Some OSs may allow you to specify "Auto" as the protocol type
        for the PS/2 mouse and the X server will automatically adjust
        itself.


     Serial mouse
        The server supports a wide range of mice, both old and new.  If
        your mouse is of a relatively new model, it may conform to the
        PnP COM device specification and the X server may be able to
        detect an appropriate protocol type for the mouse automatically.

        Specify "Auto" as the protocol type and start the X server.  If
        the mouse is not a PnP mouse, or the X server cannot determine a
        suitable protocol type, the server will print the following
        error message and abort.


        <mousename>: cannot determine the mouse protocol



     If the X server generates the above error message, you need to
     manually specify a protocol type for your mouse.  Choose one from
     the following list:


        o  GlidePoint

        o  IntelliMouse

        o  Logitech

        o  Microsoft

        o  MMHittab

        o  MMSeries

        o  MouseMan

        o  MouseSystems

        o  ThinkingMouse

     When you choose, keep in mind the following rule of thumb:


        1. "Logitech" protocol is for old serial mouse models from
           Logitech.  Modern Logitech mice use either "MouseMan" or
           "Microsoft" protocol.

        2. Most 2-button serial mice support the "Microsoft" protocol.

        3. 3-button serial mice may work with the "Mousesystems"
           protocol. If it doesn't, it may work instead with the
           "Microsoft" protocol although the third (middle) button won't
           function.  3-button serial mice may also work with the
           "Mouseman" protocol under which the third button may function
           as expected.

        4. 3-button serial mice may have a small switch at the bottom of
           the mouse to choose between ``MS'' and ``PC'', or ``2'' and
           ``3''.  ``MS'' or ``2'' usually mean the "Microsoft"
           protocol.  ``PC'' or ``3'' will choose the "MouseSystems"
           protocol.

        5. If the serial mouse has a roller or a wheel, it may be
           compatible with the "IntelliMouse" protocol.

        6. If the serial mouse has a roller or a wheel and it doesn't
           work with the "IntelliMouse" protocol, you have to use it as
           a regular 2- or 3-button serial mouse.

     If the "Auto" protocol is specified and the mouse seems to be
     working, but you find that not all features of the mouse are
     available, that is because the X server does not have native
     support for that model of mouse and is using a ``compatible''
     protocol according to PnP information.

     If you suspect this is the case with your mouse, please enter a bug
     report at http://bugzilla.freedesktop.org, using the xorg product.


     USB mouse
        If your mouse is connected to the USB port, it can either be
        supported by the "Auto" protocol, or by an OS-specific protocol
        (see below), or as a generic Human Interface Device by the "usb"
        protocol.


     Standardized protocols
        Mouse device drivers in your OS may use the standardized
        protocol regardless of the model or the class of the mouse.  For
        example, SVR4 systems may support "Xqueue" protocol.  In FreeBSD
        the system mouse device /dev/sysmouse uses the "SysMouse"
        protocol.  Please refer to the OS support section of this file
        for more information.



  5.  xorg.conf Options


  The old Pointer section has been replaced by a more general
  InputDevice section. The following is a minimal example of an
  InputDevice section for a mouse:


  Section "InputDevice"
          Identifier      "Mouse 1"
          Driver          "mouse"
          Option          "Device"    "/dev/mouse"
          Option          "Protocol"  "Auto"
  EndSection



  The mouse driver supports the following config file options:


  5.1.  Buttons

  This option tells the X server the number of buttons on the mouse.
  Currently there is no reliable way to automatically detect the correct
  number.  This option is the only means for the X server to obtain it.
  The default value is three.


  Note that if you intend to assign Z axis movement to button events
  using the ZAxisMapping option below, you need to take account of those
  buttons into N too.


          Option  "Buttons"   "N"



  5.2.  ZAxisMapping

  This option maps the Z axis (wheel) motion to buttons or to another
  axis.


          Option  "ZAxisMapping"      "X"
          Option  "ZAxisMapping"      "Y"
          Option  "ZAxisMapping"      "N1 N2"
          Option  "ZAxisMapping"      "N1 N2 N3 N4"



  The first example will map the Z axis motion to the X axis motion.
  Whenever the user moves the wheel/roller, its movement is reported as
  the X axis motion. When the wheel/roller stays still, the real X axis
  motion is reported as is. The third example will map negative Z axis
  motion to the button N1 and positive Z axis motion to the button N2.
  If this option is used and the buttons N1 or N2 actually exists in the
  mouse, their actions won't be detected by the X server.

  The last example is useful for the mouse with two wheels of which the
  second wheel is used to generate horizontal scroll action, and the
  mouse which has a knob or a stick which can detect the horizontal
  force applied by the user.  The motion of the second wheel will be
  mapped to the buttons N3, for the negative direction, and N4, for the
  positive direction.  If the buttons N3 and N4 actually exist in this
  mouse, their actions won't be detected by the X server.

  NOTE #1: horizontal movement may not always be detected by the current
  version of the X11R7.5 X servers, because there appears to be no
  accepted standard as to how the horizontal direction is encoded in
  mouse data.

  NOTE #2: Some mice think left is the negative horizontal direction,
  others may think otherwise.  Moreover, there are some mice whose two
  wheels are both mounted vertically, and the direction of the second
  vertical wheel does not match the first one's.

  You need to edit the xorg.conf file by hand to change this option if
  the default value of "4 5 6 7" does not match the needs of your
  configuration.


  5.3.  Resolution

  The following option will set the mouse device resolution to N counts
  per inch, if possible:


          Option  "Resolution"        "N"



  Not all mice and OSs can support this option.

  5.4.  Drag Lock Buttons

  Some people find it difficult or inconvenient to hold a trackball
  button down, while at the same time moving the ball. Drag lock buttons
  simulate the holding down of another button. When a drag lock button
  is first pressed, its target buttons is "locked" down until the second
  time the lock button is released, or until the button itself is
  pressed and released. This allows the starting of a drag, the movement
  of the trackball, and the ending of the drag to be separate
  operations.


          Option  "DragLockButtons"   "W X Y Z"



  This option consists of pairs of buttons. Each lock button number is
  followed by the number of the button that it locks. In the above,
  button number "W" is a drag lock button for button "X" and button
  number "Y" is a drag lock button for button "Z".

  It may not be desirable to use multiple buttons as drag locks.
  Instead, a "master drag lock button" may be defined. A master drag
  lock button acts as a "META" key. After a master lock button is
  released, the next button pressed is "locked" and not released until
  the second time the real button is released.


          Option  "DragLockButtons"   "M"



  Since button "M" is unpaired it is a master drag lock button.


  6.  Mouse Gallery


  In all of the examples below, it is assumed that /dev/mouse is a link
  to the appropriate serial port or PS/2 mouse device.


  6.1.  MS IntelliMouse (serial, PS/2)

  This mouse has a wheel which also acts as the button 2 (middle
  button).  The wheel movement is recognized as the Z axis motion.  This
  behavior is not compatible with XFree86 versions prior to 3.3.2, but
  is more consistent with the support for other mice with wheels or
  rollers.  If you want to make the wheel behave like before, you can
  use the "ZAxisMapping" option as described above.

  IntelliMouse supports the PnP COM device specification.

  To use this mouse as a serial device:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"


  or:

          Option  "Protocol"  "IntelliMouse"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports PS/2 mouse
  initialization:
          Option  "Protocol"  "IMPS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device but the OS does not support PS/2
  mouse initialization (the wheel won't work in this case):

          Option  "Protocol"  "PS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports automatic
  PS/2 mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  6.2.  MS IntelliMouse Explorer (PS/2, USB)

  This mouse has a wheel which also acts as the button 2 (middle
  button).  There are two side buttons; they are recognized as the
  buttons 4 and 5.  The wheel movement is recognized as the Z axis
  motion.

  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports PS/2 mouse
  initialization:

          Option  "Protocol"  "ExplorerPS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device but the OS does not support PS/2
  mouse initialization (the wheel and the side buttons won't work in
  this case):

          Option  "Protocol"  "PS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports automatic
  PS/2 mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  To use this mouse as the USB device and the OS supports the generic
  HID protocol:

          Option  "Protocol"  "usb"



  To use this mouse as the USB device and the OS supports automatic
  mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  6.3.  Kensington Thinking Mouse and Kensington Expert Mouse (serial,
  PS/2)

  These mice have four buttons.  The Kensington Expert Mouse is really a
  trackball.  Both Thinking mice support the PnP COM device
  specification.

  To use this mouse as a serial device:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"


  or:

          Option  "Protocol"  "ThinkingMouse"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports PS/2 mouse
  initialization:

          Option  "Protocol"  "ThinkingMousePS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device but the OS does not support PS/2
  mouse initialization (the third and the fourth buttons act as though
  they were the first and the second buttons):

          Option  "Protocol"  "PS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports automatic
  PS/2 mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  6.4.  Genius NetScroll (PS/2)

  This mouse has four buttons and a roller. The roller movement is
  recognized as the Z axis motion.

  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports PS/2 mouse
  initialization:

          Option  "Protocol"  "NetScrollPS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device but the OS does not support PS/2
  mouse initialization (the roller and the fourth button won't work):

          Option  "Protocol"  "PS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports automatic
  PS/2 mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"


  6.5.  Genius NetMouse and NetMouse Pro (serial, PS/2)

  These mice have a "magic button" which is used like a wheel or a
  roller. The "magic button" action is recognized as the Z axis motion.
  NetMouse Pro is identical to NetMouse except that it has the third
  button on the left hand side.

  NetMouse and NetMouse Pro support the PnP COM device specification.
  When used as a serial mouse, they are compatible with MS IntelliMouse.

  To use these mice as a serial device:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"


  or:

          Option  "Protocol"  "IntelliMouse"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports PS/2 mouse
  initialization:

          Option  "Protocol"  "NetMousePS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device but the OS does not support PS/2
  mouse initialization (the "magic button" and the third button won't
  work):

          Option  "Protocol"  "PS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports automatic
  PS/2 mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  6.6.  Genius NetScroll Optical (PS/2, USB)

  This mouse has a wheel which also acts as the button 2 (middle
  button), and two side buttons which are recognized as the buttons 4
  and 5.  It is compatible with NetMouse and NetMouse Pro.

  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports PS/2 mouse
  initialization:

          Option  "Protocol"  "NetMousePS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device but the OS does not support PS/2
  mouse initialization (the wheel and the side buttons won't work):

          Option  "Protocol"  "PS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports automatic
  PS/2 mouse detection:
          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  To use this mouse as the USB device and the OS supports the generic
  HID protocol:

          Option  "Protocol"  "usb"



  To use this mouse as the USB device and the OS supports automatic
  mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  6.7.  ALPS GlidePoint (serial, PS/2)

  The serial version of this pad device has been supported since XFree86
  3.2. `Tapping' action is interpreted as the fourth button press.
  (IMHO, the fourth button of GlidePoint should always be mapped to the
  first button in order to make this pad behave like the other pad
  products.)

  To use this pad as a serial device:

          Option  "Protocol"  "GlidePoint"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports PS/2 mouse
  initialization:

          Option  "Protocol"  "GlidePointPS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device but the OS does not support PS/2
  mouse initialization:

          Option  "Protocol"  "PS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports automatic
  PS/2 mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  6.8.  ASCII MieMouse (serial, PS/2)

  This mouse appears to be OEM from Genius. Although its shape is quite
  different, it works like Genius NetMouse Pro. This mouse has a "knob"
  which is used like a wheel or a roller. The "knob" action is
  recognized as the Z axis motion.

  MieMouse supports the PnP COM device specification. When used as a
  serial mouse, it is compatible with MS IntelliMouse.


  To use this mouse as a serial device:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"


  or:

          Option  "Protocol"  "IntelliMouse"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports PS/2 mouse
  initialization:

          Option  "Protocol"  "NetMousePS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device but the OS does not support PS/2
  mouse initialization (the knob and the third button won't work):

          Option  "Protocol"  "PS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports automatic
  PS/2 mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  6.9.  Logitech MouseMan+ and FirstMouse+ (serial, PS/2)

  MouseMan+ has two buttons on top, one side button and a roller.
  FirstMouse+ has two buttons and a roller. The roller movement is
  recognized as the Z axis motion. The roller also acts as the third
  button. The side button is recognized as the fourth button.

  MouseMan+ and FirstMouse+ support the PnP COM device specification.
  They have MS IntelliMouse compatible mode when used as a serial mouse.

  To use these mice as a serial device:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"


  or:

          Option  "Protocol"  "IntelliMouse"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports PS/2 mouse
  initialization:

          Option  "Protocol"  "MouseManPlusPS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device but the OS does not support PS/2
  mouse initialization (the wheel and the fourth button won't work):

          Option  "Protocol"  "PS/2"

  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports automatic
  PS/2 mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  6.10.  IBM ScrollPoint (PS/2)

  ScrollPoint has a "stick" in between the two buttons.  This "stick" is
  the same as the stick-shaped pointing device often found on notebook
  computers, on which you move the mouse cursor by pushing the stick.
  The stick movement is recognized as the Z axis motion.  You can push
  the stick to right and left, as well as forward and backward. Give
  four numbers to ZAxisMapping option to map movement along all these
  four directions to button actions.

  This mouse is compatible with Logitech MouseMan+.  To use this mouse
  as the PS/2 device and the OS supports PS/2 mouse initialization:

          Option  "Protocol"  "MouseManPlusPS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device but the OS does not support PS/2
  mouse initialization (the stick won't work):

          Option  "Protocol"  "PS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports automatic
  PS/2 mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  6.11.  8D ScrollMouse (serial, PS/2)

  ScrollMouse, also known as GyroMouse, has a "stick" similar to IBM
  ScrollPoint.  The stick movement is recognized as the Z axis motion.
  You can push the stick to right and left, as well as forward and
  backward. Give four numbers to ZAxisMapping option to map movement
  along all these four directions to button actions.

  ScrollMouse supports the PnP COM device specification. When used as a
  serial mouse, it is compatible with MS IntelliMouse.

  To use this mouse as a serial device:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"


  or:

          Option  "Protocol"  "IntelliMouse"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports PS/2 mouse
  initialization:


          Option  "Protocol"  "IMPS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device but the OS does not support PS/2
  mouse initialization (the stick won't work):

          Option  "Protocol"  "PS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports automatic
  PS/2 mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  6.12.  A4 Tech 4D mice (serial, PS/2, USB)

  A4 Tech produces quit a number of mice with one or two wheels.  Their
  mice may have 2, 3, or 4 buttons.  The wheels movement is recognized
  as the Z axis motion.  Give four numbers to ZAxisMapping option to map
  movement of both wheels to button actions.

  4D mice support the PnP COM device specification. When used as a
  serial mouse, it is compatible with MS IntelliMouse.

  To use this mouse as a serial device:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"


  or:

          Option  "Protocol"  "IntelliMouse"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports PS/2 mouse
  initialization:

          Option  "Protocol"  "IMPS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device but the OS does not support PS/2
  mouse initialization (the wheels won't work):

          Option  "Protocol"  "PS/2"



  To use this mouse as the PS/2 device and the OS supports automatic
  PS/2 mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  To use this mouse as the USB device and the OS supports the generic
  HID protocol:

          Option  "Protocol"  "usb"

  To use this mouse as the USB device and the OS supports automatic
  mouse detection:

          Option  "Protocol"  "Auto"



  7.  Configuration Examples


  This section shows some example InputDevice section for popular mice.
  All the examples assume that the mouse is connected to the PS/2 mouse
  port, and the OS supports the PS/2 mouse initialization.  It is also
  assumed that /dev/mouse is a link to the PS/2 mouse port.

  Logitech MouseMan+ has 4 buttons and a wheel. The following example
  makes the wheel movement available as the button 5 and 6.


  Section "InputDevice"
          Identifier      "MouseMan+"
          Driver          "mouse"
          Option          "Device"    "/dev/mouse"
          Option          "Protocol"  "MouseManPlusPS/2"
          Option          "Buttons"   "6"
          Option          "ZAxisMapping"      "5 6"
  EndSection



  You can change button number assignment using the xmodmap command
  AFTER you start the X server with the above configuration.  You may
  not like to use the wheel as the button 2 and rather want the side
  button (button 4) act like the button 2. You may also want to map the
  wheel movement to the button 4 and 5.  This can be done by the
  following command:


          xmodmap -e "pointer = 1 6 3 2 4 5"



  After this command is run, the correspondence between the buttons and
  button numbers will be as shown in the following table.


  Physical Buttons        Reported as:
  ------------------------------------
  1 Left Button             Button 1
  2 Wheel Button            Button 6
  3 Right Button            Button 3
  4 Side Button             Button 2
  5 Wheel Negative Move     Button 4
  6 Wheel Positive Move     Button 5



  Starting in the Xorg 6.9 release, you can also achieve this in your
  configuration file by adding this to the "InputDevice" section in
  xorg.conf:

          Option "ButtonMapping" "1 6 3 2 4 5"



  For the MS IntelliMouse Explorer which as a wheel and 5 buttons, you
  may have the following InputDevice section.


  Section "InputDevice"
          Identifier      "IntelliMouse Explorer"
          Driver          "mouse"
          Option          "Device"    "/dev/mouse"
          Option          "Protocol"  "ExplorerPS/2"
          Option          "Buttons"   "7"
          Option          "ZAxisMapping"      "6 7"
  EndSection



  The IntelliMouse Explorer has 5 buttons, thus, you should give "7" to
  the Buttons option if you want to map the wheel movement to buttons (6
  and 7).  With this configuration, the correspondence between the
  buttons and button numbers will be as follows:


  Physical Buttons        Reported as:
  ------------------------------------
  1 Left Button             Button 1
  2 Wheel Button            Button 2
  3 Right Button            Button 3
  4 Side Button 1           Button 4
  5 Side Button 2           Button 5
  6 Wheel Negative Move     Button 6
  7 Wheel Positive Move     Button 7



  You can change button number assignment using xmodmap AFTER you
  started the X server with the above configuration.


          xmodmap -e "pointer = 1 2 3 4 7 5 6"



  The above command will moves the side button 2 to the button 7 and
  make the wheel movement reported as the button 5 and 6. See the table
  below.


  Physical Buttons        Reported as:
  ------------------------------------
  1 Left Button             Button 1
  2 Wheel Button            Button 2
  3 Right Button            Button 3
  4 Side Button 1           Button 4
  5 Side Button 2           Button 7
  6 Wheel Negative Move     Button 5
  7 Wheel Positive Move     Button 6



  For the A4 Tech WinEasy mouse which has two wheels and 3 buttons, you
  may have the following InputDevice section.



  Section "InputDevice"
          Identifier      "WinEasy"
          Driver          "mouse"
          Option          "Device"    "/dev/mouse"
          Option          "Protocol"  "IMPS/2"
          Option          "Buttons"   "7"
          Option          "ZAxisMapping"      "4 5 6 7"
  EndSection



  The movement of the first wheel is mapped to the button 4 and 5. The
  second wheel's movement will be reported as the buttons 6 and 7.

  The Kensington Expert mouse is really a trackball. It has 4 buttons
  arranged in a rectangle around the ball.


  Section "InputDevice"
          Identifier  "DLB"
          Driver      "mouse"
          Option      "Protocol" "ThinkingMousePS/2"
          Option      "Buttons" "3"
          Option      "Emulate3Buttons"
          Option      "Device" "/dev/mouse"
          Option      "DragLockButtons" "2 1 4 3"
  EndSection


  In this example, button 2 is a drag lock button for button number 1,
  and button 4 is a drag lock button for button 3.  Since button 2 is
  above button 1 and button 4 is above button 3 in the layout of this
  trackball, this is reasonable.

  Because button 2 is being used as a drag lock, it can not be used as
  an ordinary button. However, it can be activated by using the
  "Emulate3Buttons" feature. However, some people my be unable to press
  two buttons at the same time. They may prefer the following
  InputDevice section which defines button 4 as a master drag lock
  button, and leaves button 2 free for ordinary use.

  Section "InputDevice"
          Identifier  "MasterDLB"
          Driver      "mouse"
          Option      "Protocol" "ThinkingMousePS/2"
          Option      "Buttons" "3"
          Option      "Device" "/dev/mouse"
          Option      "DragLockButtons" "4"
  EndSection



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